321SQN Traditions

Badge and Symbols

'Out of a Mural Crown Or, a Mount Vert thereon a Lighthouse proper, surmounting Wings elevated argent and sable.'

The central motif on the 321 Squadron badge is derived from the crest of the City of Newcastle coat of arms. The lighthouse symbolizes the well-known Nobby's Head Light, while the Mural Crown signifies city status. The wings are in the style of sea birds, which recall the setting and the nature of the City of Newcastle, and represent 321 Squadron's association with flight.

Lighthouses symbolize the way forward, and help in navigating a safe path through challenges and difficulties. Nothing else speaks of safety and security in the face of adversity and challenge quite the way a lighthouse does. The structure itself, rising tall in the sky, represents the best of man, his most lofty of ideals, and is a focal point which symbolizes resilience, strength and guidance.

The motif is centred on a roundel of royal blue over red.

Colours

The 321 Squadron colours of royal blue and red are derived from the school colours of Newcastle Boys High School, where the squadron was first formed in February 1952, and where it was located until the mid-1990s. The colours are now representative of the greater Newcastle area, and are also used by sporting teams, clubs and organizations associated with the region.

Motto

'UNRIVALLED'

This motto was chosen by the cadets and staff of 321 Squadron, and represents their ambition for the squadron to be the pre-eminent cadet unit in the region.

Recruitment Area

321 Squadron recruits mainly from the Newcastle, Lake Macquarie, Port Stephens and the Lower Hunter areas.

Squadron Marches

The 321 Squadron quick march is 'D'ye ken John Peel?' (which translates to 'Do you know John Peel?') a famous northern British song written around 1824 by John Woodcock Graves (1795–1886) in celebration of his friend John Peel (1776–1854), who was from the Lake District. The tune was formerly the school song of Newcastle Boys High School, chosen by the school in 1913. It was also the battalion quick march of the Australian Army's 31Bn AIF, and is the authorized quick march of several other Commonwealth military units. Click HERE to listen to the 321SQN quick march.

The 321 Squadron slow march is 'Men of Harlech,' a famous military march which is traditionally said to describe the defence of a castle in Wales during the middle ages. The tune was adopted by 321 Squadron as it was considered very appropriate for an Australian Defence Force Cadet unit in Newcastle, New South Wales. Again, it is also the authorized march of many other Commonwealth military units. Click HERE to listen to the 321SQN slow march.

Significant Squadron Dates

21 February - Squadron anniversary.
15 September - Battle of Britain day.