Recruiting - Frequently Asked Questions

Thank you for your interest regarding membership of 321 Squadron, Australian Air Force Cadets (321SQN AAFC). The following are the answers to frequently asked questions about joining the AAFC.

Australian Air Force Cadets – What’s it all about?

The AAFC is a youth organisation operating within a military setting, that is administered and actively supported by the Royal Australian Air Force.

By joining the AAFC you’ll learn about aircraft and flying. You’ll also learn to be confident, self-sufficient and willing to have a go. Becoming a cadet is your opportunity to discover new challenges while having great fun. The AAFC is all about youth development, and so when you join an AAFC squadron you’ll learn to lead others and to work as a member of a team.

Many young men and women, from different cultures and all walks of life, join the AAFC to get a head start in an exciting career in civil aviation or the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF). Many senior RAAF officers and leading people in civil aviation started out with the AAFC.

Who can join the AAFC?

Anyone who is:

• aged between 13 and 18 (you can join in the year you turn 13);
• an Australian citizen or permanent resident;
• medically fit to participate in AAFC activities; and,
• given permission from his/her parent or guardian.

What do AAFC cadets do?

The AAFC will teach you valuable life skills and will develop qualities including leadership, self-reliance, confidence, teamwork and communication. It also provides young people the opportunity to experience life in the Air Force. Some of the activities undertaken by the AAFC include flying, fieldcraft, adventure training, firearms safety training, drill and ceremonial, service knowledge, aeromodelling, navigation and gliding.

When you join an AAFC Squadron you’ll learn to lead others and to work as a member of a team. Many young men and women, from different cultures and all walks of life, join the AAFC to get a head start in an exciting career in civil aviation or the Royal Australian Air force (RAAF).

When does 321 Squadron parade?

321 Squadron AAFC parades at Bullecourt Barracks, Adamstown on Wednesday evenings (during the school term) from 6.00pm to 9.30pm. The Squadron also usually conducts one weekend activity every month. These may be either one or two day activities.

During the school holidays you can go on camps at RAAF Bases, to improve your skills and learn new ones. And, you’ll experience what it is like to be permanent RAAF personnel. You might even be selected for a two to three week International Air Cadet Exchange program and travel to countries like Canada, Singapore or the USA.

Am I expected to join the RAAF?

Being a cadet doesn’t mean you have to join the RAAF. Whatever career path you decide to take, joining the AAFC will help you develop your skills and knowledge and will make getting a job easier. The skills you learn will give you the edge and will stay with you for life. There is a strong link between the RAAF and the AAFC, but cadets are not part of the RAAF – and there is no expectation of you to join the military.

What about uniforms, equipment and fees?

The AAFC is excellent value for money. You can try some challenging and amazing activities which are partly paid for by the Australian Government through the RAAF. Because of his investment we hope you’re serious about AAFC and that you’ll stay with your squadron for a reasonable period of time. But you can leave the AAFC at any time. We provide uniforms and equipment, and when you got on camps we provide the accommodation, food and travel. When you leave the AAFC you must return all uniforms and equipment. Squadrons raise extra funds through fundraising activities or contributions.

What about my school work?

Being in the AAFC won’t clash with your school work – it could even help. We know when exams are happening and we understand how important school work is. So we know when to take it easy and when to challenge you.

What will I gain by joining the AAFC?

The aim of the AAFC is to develop your:

• knowledge of and interest in the RAAF and aviation, including aviation history;
• leadership ability through self-reliance, initiative and discipline;
• character through a community spirit and good citizenship; and
• skills that will add value to the community

You’ll explore your full potential, develop confidence and self-discipline, learn a range of skills, make friends and have fun.

How do I find out more?

Visit the AAFC website at aafc.org.au.